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A survey of our readers sparked an answer and question about an endangered bird on the popular game show. Read More "BirdWatchingDaily was a source for Jeopardy!"


Location: 500 West 175th Street, New York, NY 10033


27. jul. 2021 kl. 13:45
We have bid farewell to the mountains and are now back in Oslo. The last couple of days in Beitostølen gave some good birds with an alarm calling Temminck’s Stint leading me to a well hidden and motionless youngster. A couple of noisy juvenile Merlins led me to their nest and 3 Siberian Jays showed well on a dog walk. Mountain Fritillaries started flying in enormous numbers by the end of the week and my daughter picking up 30 dead ones (undoubtedly killed by cars) from a 50m length of road gives an indication of how many were on the wing. Back in Oslo my focus is still on butterflies and I have decided to try to find out the distribution of White-letter (almestjertvinge) and Purple Hairstreak (eikestjertvinge) close to my house. White-letter is listed as Vunerable on the Norwegian red list and while Purple is not listed it is rarely reported and Oslo is at the northern limit of where they are known to occur. Both these species have previously been reported from Oslo before but very infrequently although the trees they lay their eggs on: elm and oak are numerous in gardens and parks where I live so I have always thought they should be around. I have normally been away from Oslo in July when they fly which might explain why I have not noticed them before but both species also spend most of their time in tree tops so are species one doesn’t normally just bump into. There are two other species of hairstreak in Norway and surprisingly enough I have actually seen both in the garden. Brown Hairstreak (slåpetornstjertvinge) is listed as Near Threatened and turned up one August whereas Green Hairstreak (grønnstjertvinge) is a common species in the forests around Oslo but not in the city (seen in May). I asked for advice on Facebook as to how I could best find the species and was advised that White-letter at least could be found on thistles close to elm trees. Well, that hasn’t worked out for me (yet) but by scanning over oak and elm trees I have now found hairstreaks twice. It is only elms that have turned up trumps and two separate elms have had three small butterflies flying fast and erratically around them high up. Taking pictures to ascertain species has been difficult but at both trees I have managed to photograph two individual butterflies and in both instances they have been one each of the two sought after species! Quite why Purple should be flying around an elm tree with White-letter is a mystery to me but maybe butterflies attract each other and it could be the trees are especially rich in honeydew secreted by aphids and apparently the favourite source of energy for both species. We now have two days of rain but the search will continue when it is dry and sunny again. Maybe as the season wears on the butterflies will fly lower down and nectar on thistles allowing some good photos. adult Temminck's Stint which engaged in a distraction display when I walked past and this was the reason why - a half grown youngster young Merlin (dvergfalk) perched by nest two youngsters Siberian Jay (lavskrike) where I had them last time and proving that this is a reliable spot dead Mountain Fritillaries (fjellperlemorvinge) collected by Jr Jr along a 50 long stretch of road and a live individual which was spending the night (picture taken at 9.30pm) on some sorrel comparison of the underwings of Cranberry Fritillary (myrperlemorvinge) left and Mountain Fritilary - quite similar aren't they! Cranberry Fritillary we found lots of cloud berries (multer) but unfortunately and very annoyingly the majority were not yet ripe. There are some very interesting butterflies that specialise on this plant but I failed to find them


Som noget nyt har Foreningen i samarbejde med Ringmærkningscentralen udarbejdet en oversigt over (i første omgang) videnskabelige artikler, hvortil der er anvendt...


Som noget nyt har Foreningen i samarbejde med Ringmærkningscentralen udarbejdet en oversigt over (i første omgang) videnskabelige artikler, hvortil der er anvendt...


The cold 2021 spring and early summer seems to have had an impact on some of our garden butterflies – so far in 2021 nearly all of the 13 species, monitored as part of the British Trust for Ornithology’s (BTO) Garden BirdWatch (GBW), are being seen in fewer gardens and are also appearing later than usual. The cold […]


Today, we woke up early to do migration counts and morning observation on the beach at Grenen. We started off sitting on the beach close to the water watching a flock of 16 sanderlings (sandløber) pass...


Tågen hang lavt, da jeg åbnede net i morges. Idet jeg passerede indkørslen til fuglestationens område, kastede jeg et blik over mod Poststien på den anden side af vejen, og så snart alle net var...


I dag stod vi op til et huk indhyllet i tåge, da vinden var svag. Derfor var de første timer på obsen ikke i særlig højt tempo, men efter en time klarede det op og vaderne begyndte at trække i vanlig...


26. jul. 2021 kl. 19:04
Location: 562 West 164th Street, New York, NY 10032


Location: 752 St. Nicholas Avenue, New York, NY 10031


Location: 750A St. Nicholas Avenue, New York, NY 10031


A bill to reauthorize the Magnuson-Stevens Act boosts protections for seabirds.


Discovered in the remote cloud forests of the Kumawa Mountains, New Guinea The post Meet the Satin Berrypecker, a new bird species from Papua appeared first on British Ornithologists' Union.


PJ, the Suffolk-based satellite tag-wearing Cuckoo who recently completed his fifth whole migration to and from Africa, flying over 50,000 miles in doing so, is off again – he left Suffolk heading south on 9 July. The British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) have been following PJ’s migrations closely since his satellite tag was fitted in […]


Endnu en dag med østlige vinde gav flere vadefugle på morgenobsen. Dagens obs startede 05.15 og blev som vanligt gennemført 3 timer frem. Obsen startede fint med 2 Svaleklire som kortvarigt rastede...


Another slow day at the station today, with ringing not available to me and Mathilde alone we were left to catch up on data during the day and general upkeep of the station/ lab etc. Mathilde went shopping...


Det var en god start på dagen at opdage, at der ikke længere var skybrudsvarsel for Gedser. Det kom så på igen senere, men først fra kl. 11, hvor standardmærkningen ville være overstået. Jeg holdt...


Det er stadig en gåde, hvordan fuglene finder vej på trækket. Men nu er man (måske) kommet et skridt videre i opklaringen af gåden. Teorien om, at fugle kan...


There are only four breeding pairs of Fatu Hiva Monarchs left on earth – the tragic victims of invasive species. Our French Polynesian Partner SOP Manu knows exactly what to do, having brought a similar bird, the Tahiti Monarch, back from the brink of extinction. But they urgently need your help. How many families live […]


Klokken 05:15 startede vores daglige morgenobservation. Vi fik talt ca 500 fjordterner, 400 sortænder og et konstant træk af vadefugle. Efter en halvanden time begyndte det at regne ret voldsomt, så...


Today I was the lucky one who got to sleep the extra hour as Esben and Frank opened the net. I joined them in time for the results of the first round, mostly common whitethroats (tornsanger) and marsh...


Det var sådan en dag med en nedbørsradar, som kan gøre en ringmærker nervøs, så jeg valgte at nøjes med 101 netmeter, så jeg hurtigt kunne lukke, hvis det blev nødvendigt.Da alle net var åbnet,...


Nyhedsbrev fra Projekt hedehøg – 18. juli 2021 Midt i juli plejer vi at se de første unger flyver af rederne. Det kommer ikke til at ske i år. På grund af...


Have you heard of Gru and Dru? They’re two little Common Crane (Grus grus) chicks who are just nine weeks old. They’re eating roots, hanging around the nest, and beginning to fly short distances; like other chicks of their age. But they are not just any cranes: these two little chicks are possibly the first […]


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